Immigration Law

Memo proposes not counting undocumented immigrants

Undocumented immigrants in Indiana may not be counted in the census for the purposes of funding or for determining congressional representation by population numbers. This is the aim of the Trump administration, but the American Civil Liberties Union says it will challenge the memorandum in court. The memo was signed by President Donald Trump on July 21. In 2019, the Trump administration sought to include a question on the census about citizenship status. However, this was rejected by the Supreme Court. It is unclear how a person's citizenship will be determined as a result, although the...

read more

Some Indiana ‘green card’ renewals require reverification

Federal immigration law does not automatically require an employer of a lawful permanent resident (LPR) to reverify that worker’s credentials. The U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security on May 15 issued a notice that clarifies when job providers need to seek employment-eligibility reverification to maintain LRP-workers’ eligibility to continue working and living in Indianapolis and other parts of the United States. Continues legal iimmigration only requires LPR reverification in limited instances. Three scenarios require reverification Federal law can be confusing but can make sense when explained...

read more

Immigration policy in the U.S

Recently, many individuals are looking for more opportunities beyond the borders of their countries. Many individuals seek employment opportunities and investment opportunities overseas. However, immigration into a foreign country has protocols, and some individuals are likely to violate these protocols. Due to this, there are regulations to govern immigration, and among the states to set strict regulations is Indianapolis. In this article, we are going to focus more on immigration laws. As the United States in going towards the electioneering time, there is more likely that the aspiring...

read more

The backlog of immigration cases confirmed

Residents of Indianapolis may have heard the courts confirm that there is a backlog of immigration cases to be heard. Because of the pandemic, undocumented immigrants will most likely have to wait longer for a hearing. According to reports, those who are already in detention centers will have to wait three to six months for Chicago's immigration court. Others who are not detained may have to wait at least five years; this is due to the backlog during the COVID-19 pandemic. Only 10 judges oversee thousands of cases; they are responsible for Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky and Wisconsin. With not...

read more

The process of obtaining a voluntary departure

Foreign nationals who are being held at detention centers in Indiana or any other state may request a voluntary departure. However, they may only ask for a voluntary departure if they have been in the country for at least a year. Furthermore, a request cannot be granted until after a hearing is held, and it can take up to 60 days for a person to be seen by an immigration judge. An immigrant who has been charged with a serious crime may be detained until their case has been resolved. Those who are allowed to leave the country on their own will have 120 days to do so. One of the benefits of...

read more

Major changes for work visas in the U.S.

The USCIS administration has long held that employers must provide a detailed itinerary for the location and duties of all prospective employees they wish to move to the United States for work positions. This transition began with specific companies needing IT workers from countries such as India where there are many qualified workers, but now, it appears the removal of the itinerary requirement will become general government policy for all foreign nationals wanting to work in the U.S. on an H-1B visa, including in Indiana. A recent ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court decision in the...

read more

Green card renewal denial is on the rise

In Indiana and across the U.S., the likelihood of immigrants being denied a green card renewal has been on the rise. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services reports that it rejects roughly 8% of green card applications and petitions. Thousands more green card renewal applications are denied by the USCIS. Specifically, the USCIS denied an average of 30,242 green card renewal applicants per year during fiscal years 2016-2017. For fiscal years 2018-2019, the average shot up to 103,140 applicants per year that were denied green card renewals. When an applicant is denied a green card...

read more

How the immigration freeze will affect employment visas

Foreign nationals may be affected by immigration changes announced by the United States government on April 21. The H1-B and EB-5 visas are both exempt from the changes, but individuals who wish to move to Indiana on either of these visas may encounter other obstacles. Danger for the H-1B visa? The immigration freeze, which is supposed to last for 60 days, does not affect several other categories, including science and health professionals working on COVID-19 as well as spouses and eligible family members of lawful permanent residents and citizens. However, the U.S. government's focus on...

read more

Draft executive order tightens restrictions on H-1B worker visas

Employers in Indiana with foreign technology workers in the country on the H1-B visa program may soon face new restrictions and requirements. A draft executive order from President Donald Trump will place a stronger emphasis on protecting American workers. The executive order would call on technology workers already here with H1-B visas to submit updated information about their certifications. Their paperwork must indicate that they are not displacing Americans who could be doing their jobs. Additionally, the order calls for a suspension on approving entry for people seeking work visas for a...

read more

Video hearings become more common for detained children

The images of detained immigrant children have sparked concerns in Indiana and across the country, and some worry that the increased use of video hearings to process their cases may impose additional challenges. Video hearings, rather than in-person court sessions, are being used in more cases involving immigrant children, often those who are held in detention or who are unaccompanied minors. Many of the hearings have taken place in Houston while the judge hearing the cases is in Atlanta. However, some advocates believe that this policy may be expanded nationwide. The hearings have included...

read more