Immigration Law

ICE to target sanctuary cities

Indiana residents may have heard that in September, the Trump Administration began planning to conduct a variety of immigration enforcement operations across sanctuary cities. The operations will be carried out by Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE. These operations will occur within certain cities of California as well as Denver and Philadelphia. There have been speculations that the operations will stretch out into other states in the country too. When will these operations occur? The Homeland Security secretary is reportedly planning to be present within these locations when the...

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Companies struggle with H1-B visas

H1-B visas have long been an important form of employment-based immigration. People in Indiana should know that H1-Bs have allowed companies to fill high-skilled jobs with workers from overseas. Often, when it comes to fields like math, science and technology, there is only a small pool of talent to choose from. There may only be a handful of qualified candidates in the world, and American companies need to be able to reach them to keep their competitive edge. A political issue However, since 2017, the president has been opposed to the H1-B program. New regulations have been put in place...

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Speeding up the spousal immigration process

Some members of the United States Congress have addressed processing delays for individuals dealing with immigration matters. One area marked by Congress for improvement is spousal sponsorships. The website maintained by the U.S. Customs and Immigration services lists wait times, but families in Indiana familiar with the process for I-130 and other petitions that require a spousal sponsorship know these listed times do not tell a complete story. Immigration law allows individuals who are citizens or lawful permanent residents of the United States to sponsor a spouse or other relative who...

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Denial rates for H-1B petitions have increased

Many companies in Indiana and across the U.S. rely on H-1B visa workers to fill open positions for which they cannot find enough U.S. skilled workers. The tech industry heavily relies on securing enough employees by using the H-1B visa system. However, the denial rates for H-1B visa applications from companies have been increasing, meaning that more positions are going unfilled because of a lack of skilled workers to fill them.   H-1B visa application denial rates going up   According to a report in Forbes, companies that rely on H-1B workers are receiving an increasing number of...

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What happens after an immigrant applies for a green card

Immigrants applying for permanent residence in Indiana and the rest of the United States have certain steps to take after they receive their decision. If their application is accepted, they will be mailed a "green card" that establishes them as a permanent resident of the U.S. However, if they don't receive the card or welcome notice within 30 days, they should contact the USCIS Contact Center. If the individual moves to another house before they receive their card, that can interrupt the process. The person should always notify the USCIS contact center before they move to ensure that their...

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Memo proposes not counting undocumented immigrants

Undocumented immigrants in Indiana may not be counted in the census for the purposes of funding or for determining congressional representation by population numbers. This is the aim of the Trump administration, but the American Civil Liberties Union says it will challenge the memorandum in court. The memo was signed by President Donald Trump on July 21. In 2019, the Trump administration sought to include a question on the census about citizenship status. However, this was rejected by the Supreme Court. It is unclear how a person's citizenship will be determined as a result, although the...

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Some Indiana ‘green card’ renewals require reverification

Federal immigration law does not automatically require an employer of a lawful permanent resident (LPR) to reverify that worker’s credentials. The U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security on May 15 issued a notice that clarifies when job providers need to seek employment-eligibility reverification to maintain LRP-workers’ eligibility to continue working and living in Indianapolis and other parts of the United States. Continues legal iimmigration only requires LPR reverification in limited instances. Three scenarios require reverification Federal law can be confusing but can make sense when explained...

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Immigration policy in the U.S

Recently, many individuals are looking for more opportunities beyond the borders of their countries. Many individuals seek employment opportunities and investment opportunities overseas. However, immigration into a foreign country has protocols, and some individuals are likely to violate these protocols. Due to this, there are regulations to govern immigration, and among the states to set strict regulations is Indianapolis. In this article, we are going to focus more on immigration laws. As the United States in going towards the electioneering time, there is more likely that the aspiring...

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The backlog of immigration cases confirmed

Residents of Indianapolis may have heard the courts confirm that there is a backlog of immigration cases to be heard. Because of the pandemic, undocumented immigrants will most likely have to wait longer for a hearing. According to reports, those who are already in detention centers will have to wait three to six months for Chicago's immigration court. Others who are not detained may have to wait at least five years; this is due to the backlog during the COVID-19 pandemic. Only 10 judges oversee thousands of cases; they are responsible for Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky and Wisconsin. With not...

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The process of obtaining a voluntary departure

Foreign nationals who are being held at detention centers in Indiana or any other state may request a voluntary departure. However, they may only ask for a voluntary departure if they have been in the country for at least a year. Furthermore, a request cannot be granted until after a hearing is held, and it can take up to 60 days for a person to be seen by an immigration judge. An immigrant who has been charged with a serious crime may be detained until their case has been resolved. Those who are allowed to leave the country on their own will have 120 days to do so. One of the benefits of...

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