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July 2019 Archives

The new Trump administration asylum application process

A new Trump administration rule, which requires most migrants to apply for asylum in one of the countries they passed through before they can file for protection in the United States, has drawn sharp criticism from immigrant rights advocates and human rights organizations and will likely be challenged in the courts.

What is next for the immigration court system?

For years, the immigration court system has been plagued by systemic problems that have severely undermined its ability to deliver just and fair decisions in a timely manner. Housed within the DOJ, the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) is vulnerable to executive branch interference, a structural flaw which the current administration has exploited and which undermines the very integrity of the system. These problems are compounded by a growing case backlog that is nearing 900,000 cases. While oversight would slow the most recent policies, it would not remedy the conflict of interest inherent in an immigration court system that is firmly under the control of the Attorney General. AILA urges Congress to introduce bipartisan legislation that establishes an independent immigration court system, outside the DOJ, under Article I of the Constitution.

Immigration rule may affect asylum seekers at border

Some immigrants seeking asylum in Indiana might be denied if they passed through another country on the way to the United States. A rule by the Trump administration that was set to take effect on July 16 requires people to seek asylum in countries traveled through before doing so in the United States. There are exceptions for a few people, such as victims of human trafficking.

U.S work visa types: foreign students and business professionals

There are many reasons why immigrants from other countries, especially India and Germany, immigrate to the U.S. Those reasons almost always tie to having a better life for themselves and their loved ones. Everyone wants to be successful and have opportunities that will assist them in reaching their goals.

Visa program to sunset for non-minister religious workers

Changes are going into effect for a special immigrant visa program designed to help religious workers immigrate to Indiana or elsewhere in the United States or adjust their status to receive permanent residency. The employment-based, fourth-preference visa program has historically been available to both ministers and non-ministers coming to the U.S. to perform full-time, paid religious work. In the past, non-ministers were restricted to only 5,000 visas issued every year. However, no restrictions were placed on applications from ministers and their spouses. Now, the non-minister program is scheduled to come to an end altogether.

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